"Weblog: Prayer, Pain, and Prophecies Follow Attacks"

Mainstream and Christian media note the religious fallout of yesterday's horrific events
As The New York Timesnotes today, some Weblogs are practically made for events like these, allowing both posters and readers to share news and emotions. One great examples of this yesterday was found at Metafilter, where a massive community of readers was able not only to share personal stories of involvement with the tragedy, but also relayed information about what Web sites were working and how to work around those that weren't. (robots.cnn.com was working long after www.cnn.com was overloaded, for example, and the British Sky News was even able to offer live streaming video all day long even when the major news sites couldn't offer text.)

The Christianity Today Weblog, however, is a different kind of Weblog—mainly a collection of links to major news Web sites. This morning connections are still sporadic. If you can't get through at first, keep hitting your "refresh" button; the stories will come up eventually.

News on the death toll, responsibility, and other such matters will surely continue to develop all day long—check out Yahoo full coverage,.The New York Times, The Washington Post, BBC, CNN, and other such sites for updates. Rumors, conspiracy theories, and the occasional hard news tidbit will be available at WorldNetDaily, the Drudge Report, and elsewhere. Christianity Today Weblog's main concern this morning is with how the attack is affecting the country's religious life.

According to media around the country, one of the chief immediate effects of the attacks was the nation's unifying in prayer. The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, The Detroit News (two stories), The Baltimore Sun, Houston Chronicle, The Dallas Morning News, Honolulu Star-Bulletin, and other papers all have stories this morning about how churches opened ...

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July/August
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