Superchic[k], a rock group run as a collective, is so open to welcoming new members that it bears more resemblance to Bob Dylan's sprawling Rolling Thunder Revue than to most other CCM bands.

Of the eight members pictured on the band's debut album, Karaoke Superstars (2001), half no longer tour with the band. But they haven't necessarily quit. At concerts, the number of musicians on stage has varied anywhere from five to nine.

To compound the issue, Superchic[k] has loose definitions of who is actually part of the band. In fact, maybe you are without realizing it. "We are more a movement than a band, really," founder Max Hsu says. "The onstage lineup changes all the time."

Hsu's original concept was to represent the band with animated characters so that the focus would be not on the performers but on the message. Instead, Superchic[k] chose to operate as a collective. Some members appear on stage; others make musical, technical, or conceptual contributions behind the scenes.

Emphasizing a few players as rock stars, Hsu says, would work against the band's message that everyone has gifts.

"Such thinking encourages kids to think some people are more important than others," Hsu says. "We don't make a distinction between the guy who sells merchandise and the lead singer. The person who vacuums the floor of the Christian bookstore where our album is sold is making a difference."

Even without counting bookstore custodians, Superchic[k] is a large organization. The central touring group of the band includes bassist Matt Daly, lead singer Tricia Brock, her sister Melissa on guitar, Hsu (who plays keyboards and turntables), drummer Brian Fitch, guitarist Justin Sharbono, and, as the album says, "whoever's in the van when we leave."

On its ...

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