Today's Top Five

1. Sacks: Divestment vote "could not have been more inappropriate"
It's clear that Britain's chief rabbi, Jonathan Sacks, is upset about the Church of England's General Synod vote to divest "from companies profiting from the illegal occupation" of Palestinian territory. In an article for the Jewish Chronicle, Sacks calls the vote "ill-judged even on its own terms. The immediate result will be to reduce the church's ability to act as a force for peace between Israel and the Palestinians for as long as the decision remains in force. … The church has chosen to take a stand on the politics of the Middle East over which it has no influence, knowing that it will have the most adverse repercussions on a situation over which it has enormous influence, namely Jewish-Christian relations in Britain. The Church could have chosen, instead of penalizing Israel, to invest in the Palestinian economy. … The church's gesture will hurt Israelis and Jews without helping the Palestinians." Given the Iranian president's call to wipe Israel off the map and the anti-Semitic tone of recent Muslim demonstrations, Sacks says, "The timing could not have been more inappropriate." Israel, he says, "needs support, not vilification."

2. Baptists united There's a great piece in today's Wall Street Journal that you probably can't read without a subscription. That's too bad, because summarizing it like this—church burnings have brought black and white Baptists together in Alabama—doesn't do it justice. That's because the relatively short story is inspiring and informative without softening the edges. The Alabama Baptist Convention State Board of Missions has distributed checks for "at least" $5,000 to all 10 of the burned ...

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Weblog
Launched in 1999, Christianity Today’s Weblog was not just one of the first religion-oriented weblogs, but one of the first published by a media organization. (Hence its rather bland title.) Mostly compiled by then-online editor Ted Olsen, Weblog rounded up religion news and opinion pieces from publications around the world. As Christianity Today’s website grew, it launched other blogs. Olsen took on management responsibilities, and the Weblog feature as such was mothballed. But CT’s efforts to round up important news and opinion from around the web continues, especially on our Gleanings feature.
Ted Olsen
Ted Olsen is Christianity Today's editorial director. He wrote the magazine's Weblog—a collection of news and opinion articles from mainstream news sources around the world—from 1999 to 2006. In 2004, the magazine launched Weblog in Print, which looks for unexpected connections and trends in articles appearing in the mainstream press. The column was later renamed "Tidings" and ran until 2007.
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