Gabby Douglas had "a good feeling" when she arrived in London last week.

"It was raining and I thought, It's going to be a great day," she toldPeople. "My mom used to tell me when I was little, 'When it rains, it's God's manifestation, a big day's waiting to happen.'

"I texted my mom, 'It's raining. You know what that means.'"

For most of the athletes at that day's Olympic events, the London drizzle meant an outstanding performance quickly forgotten amid the other, slightly more outstanding performances. For Douglas, it meant a gold medal in the women's gymnastics individual all-around, making her the first black woman in Olympic history to achieve this accomplishment.

The buoyant 16-year-old Christian from Virginia Beach thanked God in a live interview following her triumph: "I give all the glory to God. It's kind of a win-win situation. The glory goes up to him and the blessings fall down on me." Shortly thereafter she tweeted Psalm 103:2: "Let all that I am praise the LORD; may I never forget the good things he does for me," before receiving Twitter shout-outs from Oprah Winfrey, Lady Gaga, and the President of the United States. While the public seems more interested in Douglas's hair than her steadfast faith, her public display of thanking God for such a win—especially given her many challenges in life—was inspiring to this Christian.

On Tuesday, another world-famous Christian athlete stared down the possible win of her life. Lolo Jones, the 29-year-old runner who grew up in poverty in Baton Rouge, has spent the past four years training for the 100-meter hurdles after a stumble at the 2008 Beijing Games caused her to fall from the lead to seventh. The current American record holder in the 60m hurdles, Jones frequently ...

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