I love fashion. I click through photos of the eye-popping pieces walking down fashion week runways. I ogle celebrity styles, like Michelle Obama's silk Thom Brown ensemble and her Jason Wuu gown at the inauguration. I recently read a Wall Street Journal article trumpeting the "return of the five-figure dress," which reported that "clothes really can cost as much as a house."

Then, in a blog post, I discovered a new word for myself: frugalista. See, I love fashion, but looking at high-end fashion with its high-end price tags just makes me feel smug.

The newest addition to my own closet is a trendy cape-fronted gray jacket. I bought it at a thrift store. When I wore it to run errands the other day, I was stopped by a fellow customer. "I have that same jacket!" she gushed, "Did you get it at Nordstrom's?" I discovered she had paid $60 for hers; I paid $9.

I'm a Goodwill stalker and a Craigslist surfer. When I travel, I check out the consignment boutiques. My husband and I even have our own version of a haul video. I hold up my purchases, and he guesses how much I paid for them. They're always from the clearance rack.

Did I mention my $300 wedding gown? My $3 designer shoes? My $1 boutique-label dress?

One day my friend Jessica stopped me and my $8 suede boots in our tracks. "Christian women think it's only people with expensive outfits who are prideful," she said, "but Christians can be just as proud. . . of their bargains."

She's right, of course. This frugalista has a dark side, and the Biblical word is not so nice: it's pride.

I do have some decent reasons for thrifting. For one thing, wearing inexpensive clothing allows ...

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