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Lawyers for the Least of These

Bruce Strom’s legal assistance nonprofit takes its cues from the Good Samaritan.
Lawyers for the Least of These
Gospel Justice: Joining Together to Provide Help and Hope for those Oppressed by Legal Injustice
Our Rating
3 Stars - Good
Book Title
Gospel Justice: Joining Together to Provide Help and Hope for those Oppressed by Legal Injustice
Author
Publisher
Moody Publishers
Release Date
June 1, 2013
Pages
208
Price
$15.99
Buy Gospel Justice: Joining Together to Provide Help and Hope for those Oppressed by Legal Injustice from Amazon

With hundreds of churches as clients and a case that reached the Supreme Court, Bruce Strom had a law practice that both Christian and secular lawyers would covet. But some 13 years ago, his career took an unexpected turn.

After a sequence of events that included two rainbows and the conception of twins after seven years of trying, Strom launched the Illinois-based organization Administer Justice, "a comprehensive program of educational outreach, legal assistance, financial counseling, and conflict resolution services" for clients who otherwise could not afford them. Three years later, God "threw him overboard," and Strom found himself running the ministry full-time at poverty-level wages. Gospel Justice: Joining Together to Provide Help and Hope for Those Oppressed by Legal Injustice interweaves the story of Administer Justice (which takes its name from Zechariah 7:9) with a call for lawyers and nonlawyers alike to "leave the comfort of the boat to step into the storm of injustice."

Each of the book's ten chapters takes its cue from a character or other feature of Jesus' parable of the Good Samaritan who, unlike the priest and Levite who pass by, comes to the aid of a beaten and robbed man. In one chapter, the Samaritan himself teaches the importance of taking risks to assist others; a chapter on the robbers explores how America's poor and aged are often taken advantage of; the priest is an object lesson in making excuses for not helping; and the Levite provides a lesson on harsh views of justice. Even the inn where the injured man stayed makes an appearance (a symbol of the church's responsibility to provide refuge), as does the Jericho Road (the need for social change). ...

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