Women have always longed for the men of romance novels. In some ways, that's what romance novels are for. The latest romance subgenre, though, has its own effects. Not only may readers of Amish fiction compare their husbands' bodies to a hunky hero like Levi Yoder, but also their own households to the bucolic, romanticized Amish life.

As I started reading these so-called bonnet-rippers, I found myself glancing across the bed at my husband, thinking:

"How come you don't lead daily Bible time with the kids?" (Never mind he does it once in a while.)

"Do you even cherish me like Christ does the church?" (Never mind he just wrote me a beautiful Mother's Day card.)

"When was the last time you took me to a barn raising and got me cold lemonade even though the Bishop said I was too young?" (Okay, that one's totally an Amish thing.)

Chapters deep into unrealistic expectations, I started feeling like my husband wasn't enough of a spiritual leader and that I wasn't enough of a hospitable, home-cooking wife. Don't get me wrong. I tried the simple life. I homeschooled our kids. I even made my own bread… once. I long for the less-hurried life, and it seems I am not alone.

Today's readers want to escape the pace of hypermodern life, and living vicariously through the lives of the Amish offers one way to do so, according to Valerie Weaver, author of Thrill of the Chaste: The Allure of Amish Romance Novels.

These books, depicted with sunny rural settings and demure women, have replaced the champagne glasses and hot pink covers of chick lit titles. According to the Los Angeles Review of Books, a new Amish romance novel hit the market every four days ...

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