Marissa Mayer does it. Condeleezza Rice admits to it; so does Meg Whitman. And while I suspect Sheryl Sandberg indulges, in Lean In, her bestselling new non-fiction grenade on girl-power in high corporate places, the topic never comes up.

The topic is prayer—God's finger on the scales of life balance—and while I understand why Sandberg might leave it in the closet for this book, for Christians, in this case Christian women professionals, no conversation about real power or genuine influence can go without it.

I speak now from my own needs and my own path through college and business school, corporate America, marriage, a divorce, single parenting, remarriage/instant family-blending, and life's inevitable blindsides when I say that where a woman stands—in heels or otherwise—profoundly links to an act in private, in her closet, under her breath, mentally, in the car, and in groups of likeminded believers.

If I didn't know from Christ's example and guidance, I'd know from my own stumbling that in the plate glass halls of power only God can pull us to the right side of the unseen lines between using people as objects and seeing them as people... between human aggression and divine boldness... between risk and recklessness. Business has exposed me to some exceptional thinkers, and several stand out, but only prayer can bring wisdom that transcends human decision-making. Prayer for humility (and for the desire for it) is the only effective means I know to erase lines between leadership and the life of a servant.

Sheryl Sandberg, 43 years old, is COO of a globe-spinning communications revolution, and though we haven't met, I believe I would like her. As Facebook's COO, ...

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