President Barack Obama recently announced a major initiative aimed at helping and healing young black men. The biblically named "My Brother's Keeper" enlists private sector donations toward programs for black men to meet more success and less negativity in American culture.

In our country, black men have historically faced more struggles than black women, who outstrip black males in earning college degrees and finding a spot in the middle class. The reasons for this are many and varied, but include the remnants of racism, a lack of hope in the American dream; anger at being viewed as suspect and frequently inferior by the larger culture; a public education system based on wealth of the surrounding community that doesn't adequately prepare students academically; and self-inflicted wounds reflecting a fractured self-worth that often embraces a street culture of machismo, violence, and absentee fatherhood.

This street culture has infected the view some have of African American men, despite the successes of prominent black men such as Kenneth Chenault, longtime CEO of American Express, and President Obama himself. Many expected Obama's outreach to this population to come sooner.

As My Brother's Keeper was announced last week, the headlines also remembered the fates of young black men who died too soon. Obama's press conference came a day after the second anniversary of Trayvon Martin's death and just weeks after the close of the trial of the man who killed another 17-year-old Florida boy, Jordan Davis. The jury could not come to an agreement that Davis' killer, Michael Dunn, was guilty of murder or even manslaughter after he gunned down the victim in a convenience store after an ...

Subscriber access only You have reached the end of this Article Preview

To continue reading, subscribe now. Subscribers have full digital access.

Posted: