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A Gallery of thumbnail sketches of close and influential family and friends of C.S. Lewis
Bunyan in Prison—Ministry in Suffering
About 200 A.D., under the reign of Roman emperor Septimius Severus, persecution broke out against the Christians. It was particularly severe in North Africa. In Carthage, a Christian woman of noble birth, Perpetua, was arrested. She was about 22 years old and was nursing an infant son. In what may be the earliest extant Christian document from a woman's pen, she wrote her own story. The account of her death was, of course, added later.
She singlehandedly revolutionized the field of nursing, a mission that began with a call to God's service at age 17.
How an awkward country boy with a grade-school education became the greatest evangelist of the Gilded Age.
William Booth was born in economic and spiritual poverty, yet he founded a worldwide organization dedicated to their eradication.
Their struggles and achievements
From birth to death, a peasant woman's difficult life intersected the church.
Significant people in Dietrich Bonhoeffer's life
His controversial yet Christ-centered beliefs were formed not only in the classrooms of Tübingen, but also in the cells of Tegel Prison.
Little-known or remarkable facts about Martin Luther's Early Years
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March 19, 1229: Having negotiated a treaty with Muslims for Christian access to Jerusalem, Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II (a reluctant participant in the sixth crusade) enters the Church of the Holy Sepulcher and crowns himself king. But his peace treaty was denounced by members of both faiths, and the same day the Catholic patriarch of Jerusalem pronounced an interdict on the city. Frederick was later excommunicated for making peace instead of war (see issue 40: The Crusades).

March 19, 1684: Jean ...

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