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Zwingli's Historic Reformation Sermon
In a historic sermon preached on the third day of the second Zurich Disputation, Zwingli set forth his understanding of the ministry in a lengthy message that is timeless in the application. Excerpts from this sermon are found in the "From the Archives" section of this magazine. In this article Dr. Fritz Büsser discusses the central thrust of Zwingli's understanding of the nature of the ministry as aticulated in "The Shepherd" sermon.
A number of prominent leaders, scholars, and benefactors of the early church were women and—despite neglect by many modern historians—the diligent researcher can still uncover a rich history.
What happened to the church between the vibrantly pluralistic 1st century and the legalistic, male-dominated 3rd century?
The Apostle's writings are foundational to the standard interpretation of what women's role in the church should be. But examined carefully, his points about women raise several puzzling questions
This Christian History Gallery focuses on associates of Caspar Schwenckfeld, and on his followers who traveled to Pennsylvania to escape persecution.
This letter was sent from Lombardy to Lyons to express the outcome of an early meeting, which was held in Bergamo, Italy, between members of two separate Waldensian groups. Though the two groups differed in their approaches to the life of The Poor, the outcome of the meeting was a "new sense of unity."* [* Some descriptions used in these Archives are derived from those given in the text of Giorgio Tourn's You Are My Witnesses. These documents are taken from Tourn's book.]
Why did mysticism flower in the medieval world—and why did women often lead in it?
Though known as a theologian and resister, Dietrich Bonhoeffer was also a pastor—even in his final moments.
These Christian generals helped wage the Civil War, and their faith affected how they did it.
While carrying tracts to Union troops, one preacher was seized by Confederates as a spy.
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April 22, 1418: The Council of Constance ends, having finally ended the Great Western Schism. When the schism began nearly 40 years earlier, three men had reasonable claims to the papacy. The council deposed all three and elected Martin V. (Martin then turned around and rejected further councils' right to depose a pope.) Though that part of the council is regarded as a triumph, the council also hastily condemned Jan Hus, a Bohemian preacher and forerunner of Protestantism, and sentenced him to execution ...

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