Today in Christian History

September 12

September 12, 1729: John W. Fletcher, early Methodist theologian, is born. During the Calvinism-Arminianism controversy within Methodisism in the mid-eighteenth century, Fletcher became the chief defender of evangelical Arminianism. John Wesley hoped Fletcher would be his successor, but Fletcher died six years before Wesley (see issue 2: John Wesley and issue 69: Charles and John Wesley).

September 12, 1788: Alexander Campbell, one of the founders of the Disciples of Christ and the Church of Christ, is born in Ballymena, Ireland (see issue 45: Camp Meetings and Circuit Riders).

September 12, 1922: The American Episcopal church votes to excise the words "to obey" from its wedding service's marriage vows.

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June 19, 325: Bishop Hosius, a delegate at the Council of Nicea, announces the newly written Nicene Creed. Countering Arius, who taught that "there was a time when the Son was not," the creed describes Christ as "God from very God, begotten not made" (see issue 51: Heresy in the Early Church).

June 19, 1566: James VI of Scotland, who later became King James I of England, is born. He wrote treatises on the divine right of kings, witchcraft, biblical themes, and set into motion a translation of the ...

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