Church & Culture
Did 2016 Expose America's (And the Church's) Fame Addiction?
The church should be providing a counter-cultural balance to our fame obsession. Instead, we're feeding into it.

And the American church isn’t much better.

We Need to Counter the Fame Culture

The church should be providing a counter-cultural balance to our fame obsession. Instead, we feed into it.

Fame is about one thing. Pride.

And pride is a sin. But we treat it like it’s a virtue. Even in the church.

Pride is a sin. But we treat it like it’s a virtue. Even in the church.

We elevate a handful of people to Christian Celebrity status (such an obnoxious term!), then we’re shocked when the weight of that celebrity contributes to their burnout and/or moral failure – several of which happened in 2016.

Meanwhile, most of the ministry being done by Christians goes unseen, unknown, unheralded and increasingly under-funded.

Let’s End Our Christian Celebrity Crush

Everyone matters.

Because we’re all made in the image of God and loved by Jesus.

Jesus taught us when you throw a party, don’t invite your rich and famous friends, invite the poor and the outcast. The ones who can’t pay you back.

Sit at the end of the table.

Have faith like a little child.

Don’t think of yourself more highly than you should.

And walk humbly with your God.

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December 30, 2016 at 9:19 AM

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