Church Leadership
Why I Don’t Trust New Year’s Resolutions or 10-Year Plans
Innovation has more room to breathe when we’re operating within God’s seasons instead of on our schedules.

I’m not some sort of New Year’s Grinch. I like the feeling of a fresh start that comes with putting a new calendar on the wall. So if January 1 can help us pause, reflect, assess and plan, that’s a good thing.

But when someone says God has a plan that starts on January 1, color me skeptical. On the other hand, when a church leader says the Lord laid something on their heart in mid-July and they’re going to follow it until they see where God takes them, I’m a little more likely to give them the benefit of the doubt.

Also, if we’re listening especially close to God in December about the upcoming year, why not do that every day? What are we doing the rest of the year? Coasting on January’s plan?

Innovators Are Not Clock-Watchers

None of this excuses us from proper planning and stewardship of our time and resources. Financial reports and building plans need clear start and end dates. But mission, vision and innovation happen on a different time clock than our annual budget reports – or they should, anyway.

Mission, vision and innovation happen on a different time clock than our annual budget reports.

If we listen to the voice of the Holy Spirit and pay attention to the seasons he works in, we can do special things.

That starts with planning, of course. But those plans must be adjustable and adaptable as circumstances change, ideas arise or we feel a special nudge from the Holy Spirit – no matter what the calendar on the wall says.

Innovation has more room to breathe when we’re operating within God’s seasons instead of on our schedules.

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The views of the blogger do not necessarily reflect those of Christianity Today.

December 29, 2016 at 3:40 AM

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