Church Leadership
12 Simple Steps for More Effective Small Church Planning Meetings
Since planning meetings are harder to do in a small church, it’s even more important to make them matter.

I’m a big believer in planning. But I’m not a fan of meetings.

Yet planning requires meetings. So what’s the answer?

We can do more effective planning by having more effective meetings.

We can do more effective planning by having more effective meetings.

In fact, when the meetings are more effective, we can usually have fewer of them. That’s what I call a win-win.

Planning Is Different In the Small Church

There’s been a lot written about effective planning meetings from a big church perspective. But very little has been written with the challenges of small churches in mind.

For instance, most church planning advice assumes that everyone will have no problem showing up, because they have a paid staff.

That’s not the case in a small church. In many situations everyone is unpaid, including the pastor, making even the most basic assumptions moot.

Since planning meetings are harder to do in a small church, it’s even more important to make them matter. That’s why, when our church has planning meetings, I make sure to meet these 12 criteria.

Meetings must be:

1. Consistent

Whether your meetings are weekly or monthly, when people know that the meeting will always be on such-and-such a day, they can plan further in advance. It’s very helpful to be the first thing on the calendar.

(For more info on long-term planning, check out The 3-2-1 System for Better Annual Small Church Planning.)

2. Task-Oriented

The difference between teams and committees is that committees talk about things, while teams do things. Some committees may be necessary for your church’s polity, or for legal reasons. But, other than those, I recommend having task-oriented teams, not committees.

3. About Solutions, Not Problems

Effective leaders keep meetings from descending into gripe sessions. The way to do that, when working on problems, is to constantly guide the conversation towards answers. And never allow it to be about blame.

And while we’re at it, I highly recommend ditching the popular ‘don’t raise a problem unless you have a solution’ rule. That’s often why a lot of important issues never get raised. Besides, if someone already has a solution, why are we having the meeting?

4. Short

Unless the church is in emergency mode, most well-planned meetings should last an hour or less. People who want to do things won’t sit for long meetings, and the people who love long meetings aren’t the ones who are doing things.

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February 29, 2016 at 12:07 PM

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