Innovative Ministry
27 Benefits of Putting an Expiration Date On New Ministries In Your Church
Here's a great way open your church up to innovative new ideas by minimizing the risk – or at least the sting – of failure.

14. Trying new ideas is fun.

15. It’s more cost-effective. You don’t invest a lot of money until the experiment has worked.

16. It’s easier to raise the needed money after people have tried it and liked it.

17. It creates an environment that makes it easier to end long-term ministries that reached their expiration date long ago.

18. It’s easier to find leaders when they know how long the commitment will last. And if it works, they’re more likely to continue. If not, you have someone who can train the next leaders.

19. Some people are starters, not maintainers. This gives them a role they can fill.

20. More new things can happen. There’s nothing like new ideas to attract new people.

21. It sparks an environment of creativity and innovation.

22. It reduces territorialism.

The church becomes more adaptable to shifts in the culture, the community and the congregation.

23. The church becomes more adaptable to shifts in the culture, the community and the congregation.

24. Some ideas can be rotated in and out on a seasonal basis, if that’s what works best for them.

25. It matches how people make commitments now. In chunks, rather than over indefinite periods of time.

26. There’s less burden on the leadership to make perfect decisions.

27. When biblical principles are permanent, but the congregation’s ideas are temporary, it reinforces what we really value.

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