Why Growth is Harder In a Small Church – And Change Is Essential
Big churches find it much easier to incorporate new people because the bigger the crowd, the smaller the impact each person has.

Those college students changed our church. In ways both expected and unexpected. And they continue to change us. For the better.

It’s not easy, but it is good.

The Smaller the Church, the Harder the Change

Every church says they want to reach out to new people. But if your church isn't willing to be changed by the unbelievers who come to your church, they won't come.

If your church isn't willing to be changed by the unbelievers who come to your church, they won't come.

Big churches find it much easier to incorporate new people because the bigger the crowd, the smaller the impact each person has. But in small churches, it's much harder because the smaller the church, the larger the impact each person has.

So how do small churches become more welcoming of newcomers?

We have to be intentional about it. We have to focus on friendliness. Not just with each other, but with new people. For a simple, practical way to start doing that, check out 4 Steps to a Friendlier Church (The G.I.F.T. Plan).

Part of that is being willing to allow them to change us.

Church leaders need to educate the congregation about the importance of being a welcoming church – and we need to lead by example.

The church needs to stick with and reinforce the eternal, unchangeable truths of God's Word. That’s what makes us a church, after all. Changing methods is not the same as changing core theology.

But we need to be open to the new ideas, sounds and customs that new people will bring with them.

We can't expect Christ to use our church to change them without letting Christ use them to change us.

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