Church & Culture
Ministering to Millennials by Leveraging the Relational Power of Healthy Churches
We need to lean away from the church-as-business model and into the church-as-relational-community model. Love God and love others.

The same goes for those who aren’t homeless. In many places, we’re raising a generation that’s rich in material goods, but poor in relationships. That’s the need we should be finding and filling.

The "Take a Number" Era of Customer Service Is Over

For about 100 years, mechanization was the height of efficiency and customer service.

It still is the height of efficiency, but we’re realizing that it’s not so great for customer service. People don’t want to be Customer 63 any more.

When they come to church they don’t want to be a member of a target demographic.

Tell Stories, Don’t Recite Stats

Boomers are impressed by growing church numbers. But people’s hearts are touched by hearing stories of life-transformation.

I love it when I hear “we baptized 75 people last Sunday!” That’s 75 eternities!

But hearing one story of life-transformation will touch more hearts than any stats you can give – no matter how impressive the numbers are.

Do Ministry With Them, Not For or To Them

Boomers are watchers. From TV, to movies, to airline flights, to churches, we’ve been trained to “sit back, relax and enjoy” whatever is being done for us.

Not any more.

Churches that are succeeding with current generations aren’t doing ministry for passive observers as much as they’re doing ministry with active participants.

The internet has turned previously passive modes of input into participatory activities. Churches that are succeeding with current generations aren’t doing ministry for passive observers as much as they’re doing ministry with active participants.

Go Digital and Analog

The two most common items appearing on church stages in the last decade are TV screens and wood pallets.

TV screens I get. But pallets?

We’ve all noted and wrung our hands about the current obsession with our digital devices. But what sometimes goes under the radar is the growing interest in real-world tactile expressions as well.

For every graphic artist using a tablet, there’s a student wanting to learn how to draw, paint or play an instrument. Or repurpose pallet wood into something beautiful. Even if it’s temporary.

Go Deeper, Not Just Bigger

Size impresses Boomers and Builders. Big stores, big screens and big churches.

There will always be a place and an appeal to bigness (I’m talking to you, my American readers!) but people are less impressed with that now than they used to be.

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The views of the blogger do not necessarily reflect those of Christianity Today.

October 12, 2016 at 9:56 AM

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