Innovative Ministry
The 3 Best Times to Bring Needed Change to a Church
Healthy churches are always looking for ways to make good things better. They don’t wait for something to break before they fix it.

In addition to recovering from crises, it’s always good to assess every event – especially the big, new ones – as soon as possible after they happen. Get honest feedback on what went well and what could have gone better, before people forget. Then devise a plan to do it better the next time around.

Assess every event – especially the big, new ones – as soon as possible after they happen.

People don’t think as clearly or work as well when they’re in the middle of emotional highs or lows. But there’s a lot of clarity on the morning after the storm passes.

But Don’t Create a Crisis

There are some leadership gurus who would tell you to create a crisis that you can take advantage of. I profoundly disagree with that on many levels.

Life is filled with enough challenges on its own, without us creating false ones. Besides, creating a false crisis is dishonest, manipulative and very likely to blow back in your face when it’s found out. Redeem the hurt, don’t create more.

3. When Everything Is Going Great

When’s the best time to fix a leaky roof? When the roof isn’t leaking.

Healthy churches are always looking for ways to make good things better. They don’t wait for something to break before they fix it. They keep fixing it so that it doesn’t break.

Life will bring unforeseen challenges. Bad things happen to good people – and to good churches. We can’t change that reality. But let’s not add to the difficulties by not fixing the things we can fix.

No, this isn’t easy. When the church is in an up season, no one wants to revisit problems. Especially if the ups are rare. But that’s when they can be dealt with the most easily and honestly.

Just like a healthy body fights off diseases better than a sick one, a healthy church uses its seasons of greatest strength to fix its weaknesses.

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The views of the blogger do not necessarily reflect those of Christianity Today.

March 30, 2017 at 2:21 AM

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