Small Church Ministry
Why Most Mission Statements Fail In Smaller Churches
In a smaller church, instead of uniting people, a mission statement can feel controlling and manipulative.

“Who does this new pastor think he/she is? We’ve been operating just fine for decades with no mission statement other than the Great Commandment and Great Commission. Why, all of a sudden, do we need one that rhymes?”

Certainly, that kind of resistance may come from stubbornness, but not necessarily.

In a big church, a clear pastor-driven statement is helpful, because it unites people. But in a small church, where they operate more on the basis of relationships, a pastor-led vision often leaves other leaders feeling marginalized.

What Is a Mission Statement Supposed To Do?

To Mission Statement, or not to Mission Statement? That is the question.

The answer? Ask what a mission statement is meant to accomplish.

A good mission statement unites people around a common purpose.

Simply put, a good mission statement unites people around a common purpose. So if your church needs one to rally around, or if it already has one that unites and motivates people, great!

But if trying to implement a new mission statement is dividing church members instead of uniting them, don’t do it.

Also, if the church is already united around a common purpose without having a mission statement other than the Great Commandment and Great Commission, you don’t need one.

A mature church leader always remembers this: a great mission is more important than a unique mission statement.

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February 05, 2018 at 2:00 AM

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