QUICK TO CRITICIZE, SLOW TO PRAY

It troubles me that, despite the emergence of evangelical political strength shown in recent Gallup polls, there's very little moral impact on the government.

The influence of the Christian church comes from the influence of individual Christian believers. If there are so many of us, we ought to be making ourselves felt.

The dynamics of Christian political influence are the same as Christian influence in every other area of life: the call for personal accountability to the truths of the Scripture.

I remember a tragic statement made to me by a man who is now a high-level executive at Bethlehem Steel. "In thirty years of life in my church, nothing was ever said or done to make me think the church had the slightest interest in what I was doing at Bethlehem Steel, nor that I had any moral accountability there as far as the church was concerned."

As pastor of a church in Washington, D.C., I think the best way I can influence our government is by influencing the people making the decisions; not ...

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From Issue:Spring 1981: Money
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