Jump directly to the Content

MINISTRY-RELATED STRESS

Most local-church leaders experience some stress in their ministries. The more clearly the source of that stress can be identified, the better the chance it can be handled appropriately. This tool (adapted from a stress survey developed by John Adams and used by Roy Oswald of the Alban Institute) is designed to help you measure the amount of stress you face and identify its source.

Stress rating scale

Many day-to-day working conditions are stressful. Rate each item below by circling the number to indicate whether it is never true for you; infrequently true, sometimes true, often true, or always true.

(1) Never (2) Infrequently (3) Sometimes (4) Often (5) Always

1 2 3 4 5 1. The congregation and I disagree on my role as pastor.

1 2 3 4 5 2. The governing board is unclear about what my job priorities ought to be.

1 2 3 4 5 3. The core of the congregation does not support me.

1 2 3 4 5 4. A group of people in the congregation wish I would move elsewhere.

1 2 3 4 5 5. I lack confidence in ...

Subscriber access only You have reached the end of this Article Preview

To continue reading, subscribe to Christianity Today magazine. Subscribers have full digital access to CT Pastors articles.

December
Support Our Work

Subscribe to CT for less than $4.25/month

Homepage Subscription Panel

Read These Next

From the Magazine
If a Social Issue Matters to God, the Church Should Be Praying About It
If a Social Issue Matters to God, the Church Should Be Praying About It
Too often, our practices of intercession are thin to nonexistent. The Reformed tradition shows us how to revive them.
Editor's Pick
The Worst (and Best) Passage for Generosity Sermons
The Worst (and Best) Passage for Generosity Sermons
The widow’s mite story is about more than her sacrificial giving.
close