Pastors' Pulse

When LEADERSHIP asked that question, here's what you said.

We've heard the bad news: Ministry is becoming harder than ever. Scores of pastors are discouraged or disillusioned. Hundreds have abandoned their call to take up secular employment.

But, according to a recent LEADERSHIP survey of 758 pastors, most American pastors thoroughly enjoy what they do and wouldn't trade places with anyone--no matter what the pay might be. (Yes: 20.1%; No: 54.6%; Maybe: 19.9%; No response: 5.3%)

What might tempt pastors to take up secular pursuits? Decidedly not money. Seven out of 10 pastors said that the possibility of more money would probably or definitely not cause them to leave ministry. (Yes: 9.9%; No: 70.7%; Maybe: 15.2%; No response: 4.2%)

Some might wonder, Are pastors rooted to their profession because they feel ill-equipped to do anything else? Not really. Fewer than one in three ministers (30.6 percent) admit to having felt trapped in the job. And as LEADERSHIP adviser Warren Wiersbe put it, "Even ...

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