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Free Hot Chocolate

Michael and C.J. respond positively while standing in the baptistery. "Are you trusting Jesus Christ alone for eternal life?" Both young men say yes. We first met them at the Laundromat one block from the church.

Ours is the tiniest church in town, 75 seats in the auditorium and the small house next door is our office and education space. We faithfully support missions around the world, but we wondered how our church could reach those in our community who need Christ. That's when we started giving away free hot chocolate.

Every Friday night starting at 5:30, we walk through our neighborhood, talking with the people we meet and offering cups of cocoa. (We call it FEET, Friday Evening Evangelism Training.)

A freshman ministerial student leads out, taking a few young people with him. Those we meet on the streets, we ask to take an opinion survey.

  • In your opinion, as we seek to build ministry in this neighborhood, should we focus on children, youth, adults, or seniors?

  • In your opinion, why do some in our community not attend church?

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