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Who Prays for Bill Ford?

We pray for politicians, but what about our business leaders?

In keeping with tradition, George W. Bush will soon issue a presidential proclamation declaring the first Thursday in May 2003 as the National Day of Prayer. This tradition dates back to George Washington and was formalized in modern times by President Reagan.

As a nation, we are quick to pray for our government and military leaders. This year is unlikely to be any different, particularly in light of the war in Iraq. We wonder, however, aren't we missing something?

The business pages remind us that the economy is still sluggish and that America's spate of corporate scandals did not end with the collapse of Enron. Shouldn't we give the same prayerful support to our nation's business leaders as they face challenges of moral and economic significance, as perhaps never before?

The Christian tradition of praying for leaders is rooted in the teachings of the apostle Paul who wrote to the first century Christian church, "I urge, then, first of all, that requests, prayers, intercessions and thanksgiving ...

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