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Is Pomo Nomo?

A postmodern pastor reaches out to the Mod Squ

(Ed. Note: Chris Seay responds to recent columns on postmodernism by Kevin Miller.)

Yes, Kevin, let's lose the word "postmodern." It's used so often it has become little more than a place keeper, or worse, a sordid synonym for "being cool." I vote we lose the fads. Keep your flash animation and dark roasted coffee (I'm a tea drinker anyway). But this reformation is not about web graphics and libations; it is one of substance that will outlast our current lingo. I'm excited you will join us in San Diego at the Emergent convention because as you join our generative friendship, you (and D'Souza, whom you quote, for that matter) will find out that this transition is rooted in carefully contemplated and heartfelt beliefs. These are some of the things you may discover over a few fish tacos on a patio in California:

  • We don't all head off to the hospital when we get sick. In fact my family's health care practitioners are homeopaths, naturopaths, and alternative providers. My children are not born in the sterile confines of an operating room; they are welcomed to the world in a large bathtub in our living room by a midwife, family, and spiritual community. Insane as it may seem to modern man whose love of science is immeasurable, we do not immunize our children or have a love affair with psychotherapy.

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