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Preaching with Power

How is proclaiming boldly to believers different from proclaiming boldly to unbelievers?

When we proclaim God's Word to the church, we can trust the authority of Scripture and not feel we're "trying" to make the Bible relevant. Our boldness comes from its sufficiency, and we simply let the lion out of the cage.

When Paul preached to the (non-believing) Corinthians, he wanted to know nothing else except Jesus Christ and him crucified.

And then he warned us not to shroud the gospel with human wisdom. The cross resonates when proclaimed in its simplicity.

I once asked Billy Graham, "If you knew as a young preacher what you know now, would your preaching have emphasized something more?"

Billy said, "The cross of Christ and the blood. That's where the power is."

How do you distinguish boldness from flamboyance?

Bold proclamation is not speaking loudly, with more emotion or passion. Many non-believers are turned off by preachers with an exaggerated, on-stage persona.

Bold proclamation is finding the ...

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From Issue:Winter 2003: Integrity & Ethics
January/February
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