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Right Tool for the Right Job

Volunteers come to us with a desire to know and be known by the people they work alongside.

Several years ago, my wife and I reached an informal agreement. If I agree to tackle a significant household project, she agrees that I can purchase any necessary materials to get the job done. In other words, I can buy the right tool for the job. We both win because I enjoy hardware stores, and she has a source of free, very willing labor.

Want the bedroom painted? A new trim brush is all I need. Replace the bathroom floor? No problem, I've always wanted a tile cutter. A new front porch requires an air compressor and several pieces of hardware, so that project can wait. In order for our "agreement" to work, we need to realize that the size of the job will typically determine the size of the tool.

Let's carry this concept into ministry.

Volunteers come to us with a desire to know and be known by the people they work alongside. When we help these relationships form, we open the door for a spirit of unity that makes serving feel more like contributing to a family project than dutifully checking ...

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