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Life... Interrupted

When you work with children, interruptions are inevitable.

When you work with children, interruptions are inevitable. If you teach a Sunday school class, there will always be the kid who acts up, or one that asks strange questions. When you prepare for that class, there will be people (often your family) who will interrupt you.

How do you handle those interruptions? It's tempting, for me anyway, to brush aside the interrupter, even if he's the little person I'm supposedly ministering to. Or to think that if I'm interrupted, I won't get everything on my list done, and that will make me have to hurry. It won't be my fault, but the fault of those who interrupt me. Right?

Do you see the irony of chastising your kids for bugging you when you're trying to put together a Sunday school lesson on Matthew 19:13-15 (you know, where Jesus said, "Let the little children come to me")?

If you read the Gospels with a discerning eye, you'll notice that Jesus was often interrupted—people questioned him, sometimes rather antagonistically, or wanted healings. ...

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