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Leader's Insight: The Pedestal Problem

How to climb down from the dizzying heights.

We are those who, by our occupation, are expected to speak easily and naturally of spiritual realities. We are called to practice our faith in public. Under the never-ending demands of ministry, our holy calling to worship, love, and serve God can gradually become corroded until our ministry becomes a career like any other profession, except that public religious performance is part of the job requirements.

It is possible to lead a worship service but neglect to worship; to sing hymns and songs of praise vigorously without directing our thoughts to God; to pray and speak of holy things without engaging our inmost being; to seek human approval rather than the approval of God

I know. I've done it

About a year into my ministry in a new congregation, I realized that I was in real danger of becoming trapped by the desire to impress people rather than depend on God. I began worrying more about "success" than about glorifying God.

The underlying tension has to do with not only what we do but with ...

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