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Leader's Insight: Construction Zone

Life in the slow lane may be God's intention for us after all.

From my journal: Earlier this week I was driving a strange road. The traffic was the rush-hour kind, and I was late, as the song says, for a very important date.

The reason for my lateness was poor planning. I'd not allowed ample time for travel in an unfamiliar area. But rather than admit this, I expressed my impatience by blaming the poorly timed red lights, the drivers ahead who insisted on making left turns, and the frequent construction projects. Especially the construction projects.

I actually fantasized that someone had foreseen my coming and had mischievously assigned road workers to "mine" the road with endeavors such as pothole filling, sewer repair, and lane painting. I tell you, the blue police lights, the orange cones, and the jersey barriers were ubiquitous.

And then as I drove I became immersed (blessed art thou!) in a vision. I saw the many construction projects as if they were people whom I encounter in my pastoral pursuits. The church is full of people who are "under construction." ...

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