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Talking About Aging

70 percent of adult children have not talked to their parents about issues related to aging.

Many of us have a hard time talking about aging and an even harder time talking about death. But as long as we are still on this planet both are inevitable. There may be something innate about being an American that makes us believe that we will be forever young. In comparison to nations like China and some European countries, America is still a young nation. Perhaps this is related to why we resist confronting aging and death.

No matter what age one is, the aging and death of loved ones impact us all. The more we realistically confront both aging and death, the easier it will be to deal with these inevitabilities. Frank conversations about aging with ourselves, our children, and our parents can create healthier relationships.

A recent survey by AARP founded that nearly 70 percent of adult children have not talked to their parents about issues related to aging. If a parent was to become disabled, bedridden, or on life support, do you know what their wishes would be? While some of us think ...

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