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A White House Visit: The Politics of Kids

I recently attended a White House event.

After showing my identification, guards confirmed my name on the guest list, and I walked into the East Room where the president and Mrs. Obama shared comments with me. Okay, me and 150 other people, as well as the White House press pool. After their remarks, I met with various White House staff and discussed reaching out to children.

Seventy-five minutes after entering our nation's most important residence, I stood in a cold breeze on Pennsylvania Avenue and tried to gather my thoughts. My visit had no connections with popular and polarizing debates over stimulus packages, bailout funds, war, healthcare reform, and the recent Massachusetts election. Instead, I pursued the politics of kids. The what? The politics of kids: what's truly important for our nation's children. I learned plenty during my visit. Let's go back in the White House and I'll explain.

Created, in part, to recognize National Mentoring Month, the event took place on January 20, and ...

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