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The Best Lesson on Forgiveness

Children develop the ability to authentically apologize when they know how it feels to receive an apology.

With Easter only days away, churches everywhere will share messages that highlight God's plan for our forgiveness. Many houses of worship will experience larger-than-usual attendance because of the significant attention this holiday commands.

But what about teaching this lesson to the small audience at home? Helping children understand how to seek forgiveness—that is, "apologizing for what you did wrong"—might not be as easy as it sounds. While many parents insist on their children saying "I'm sorry," this one-sided approach falls short. Don't abandon it, but remember to apply this important truth:

Children develop the ability to authentically apologize when they know how it feels to receive an apology.

An Example

For years, my friend Joe told me about his desire to be a dad who could freely admit failings and ask for forgiveness. Opportunity came for him at an inopportune time—an unusually rough morning as his third-grade daughter, Torri, prepared for school. Clothing indecisions, ...

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