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Skye Jethani: Redefining Radical (Part 2)

What ever happened to a theology of calling and vocation?

Read Part 1 of "Redefining Radical."

Consider who is celebrated in most churches. Typically it is the person who is engaged in "full time Christian work"–the pastor or missionary, or people who pursue social causes that result in a big and measurable impact. (Who isn't talking about William Wilberforce these days?) Similarly, those who behave like pastors or missionaries periodically in their workplace, neighborhood, or perhaps on a short-term trip overseas are praised for these actions. But a church will rarely, if ever, celebrate a person's "ordinary" life and work.

For example, Andy Crouch tells about a pastor he met in Boston. The pastor recounted the story of a woman in his congregation who was a lawyer for the Environmental Protection Agency. She played a vital role in the clean up of Boston Harbor–one of the most polluted waterways in the country. But the pastor said, "The only time we have ever recognized her in church was for her role in teaching second grade Sunday school. And ...

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