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Rethinking Success

What happens when God doesn't share your definition of ministry success?

I once heard Andy Stanley say that he loves hiring preachers' kids. Here's one reason: the old-but-true cliché that "truths are caught, not taught."

I grew up in a double-barrel ministry family, my grandpa and dad both serving as senior pastors. Combined, their legacy includes multiple congregations served and thousands of lives touched. But they are men from a different time. They would never use the word "success" to describe themselves—or even accept it being thrust upon them.

When I think of my grandpa, I picture his open Bible on the checkered tablecloth at the summer cottage. His long legs crossed comfortably while he poured God's Word into his thirsty soul. At meals he would have all of us—grandparents, parents, cousins—recite Psalm 1 together, complete with hand actions.

He was a tall man. I can still see his lanky pointer and middle fingers walking like two legs up his outstretched forearm as he recited, "Blessed ...

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