Jump directly to the Content

The Eternal Laughter of Robin Williams

A pastor reflects on the death of a great entertainer.
The Eternal Laughter of Robin Williams

Like the rest of the world, I'm stunned by the loss of one of its greatest talents.

Robin Williams defined most of our childhoods—along with Star Wars, G.I. Joe, and The Muppet Show. I was born in 1973 and so the first exposure I had to Robin Williams' comedy was in Mork and Mindy. It was on too late for me to watch, but by week two my Mom kept saying that she'd let me stay up to watch it with my brother. I was in kindergarten and staying up late was a big deal. When I saw it for the first time, I was blown away. Mork was the coolest and funniest thing I'd ever seen. He acted like a 5 year old and got away with it. In fact, my parents applauded him for it. I felt as if some breach had been made in the barrier separating children from adults. He was like a bridge between our two worlds. As a kid, I was just glad that grown-ups were beginning to see the light. (On a side note, he often made up much of his lines on the spot, and the writers learned to leave much ...

Subscriber access only You have reached the end of this Article Preview

To continue reading, subscribe to Christianity Today magazine. Subscribers have full digital access to CT Pastors articles.

Homepage Subscription Panel

Read These Next

Related
FACING COMMUNITY FURY
FACING COMMUNITY FURY
How one decision about a church nursery school ignited a firestorm.
From the Magazine
Paul’s Letter to a Prejudiced Church
Paul’s Letter to a Prejudiced Church
How the apostle’s instructions on the Lord’s Supper speak to multiethnic congregations today.
Editor's Pick
Read Your Bible Through a Kaleidoscope
Read Your Bible Through a Kaleidoscope
Multicolored scholarship expands biblical interpretation beyond traditional Eurocentric perspectives.
close