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Visitation Is Still Our Vocation

We may face new challenges, but the heart of our calling remains the same.
Visitation Is Still Our Vocation
Image: Illustration by Rick Szuecs | Source images: Klaus Vedfelt | Getty | Envato Elements

So much has changed in this world since COVID-19 reared its ugly head at the beginning of last year. The lasting and unintended consequences of quarantine have resulted in a sharp decrease in church attendance. Some parishioners who’ve stepped away from church involvement may never return. We fear that Sunday morning will forever be negatively affected.

That’s not the only matter of grave concern. The challenge of separation has made it very difficult for pastors to carry out the care of souls. Pastoral visitation—a core part of providing individual soul care—may very well continue to challenge pastors for a long while or may even be forever changed.

But one thing is certain: Even when visitation becomes more difficult, pastors are still called to deliver God’s gifts to sin-sick souls, wherever they may be. Pastoral visitation must be part of the pastor’s primary work for the care of souls. The reason: By definition, pastors are visitors.

In 1 Timothy 3:1, ...

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