We all develop survival responses in threatening situations.
—Norman Shawchuck and Bob Moeller

The women's ministries board was meeting, and you could cut the tension with a spatula.

"If the church won't provide baby-sitters for the Friday Bible study, I won't be coming back," Susan said, her voice trembling with anger. "I don't need to spend my Friday mornings in a nursery, changing diapers and holding crying babies, when I can do that at home. I come here for a break, not more work. And I'm not the only one who feels this way. Other young mothers besides me are planning to quit the Bible study unless the church begins providing paid child care."

"Susan," said Helen, an older woman on the board, "I think I understand why some of the older women oppose paying baby-sitters. They're concerned about the costs. When we were your age, we all took turns in the nursery. None of us expected a free ride. While I don't necessarily agree, some feel your generation isn't willing to make sacrifices.

"But ...

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