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Hot-Potato Preaching

The truth can be cutting, but the preacher doesn't have to be.
—Stuart Briscoe

Ihave twice passed out cards to my congregation with the following words: "I would like to hear a sermon no longer than_______minutes on the subject: What the Bible has to say about____________." Self-appointed comics took advantage of this. One fellow said he'd like to hear a sermon no longer than five minutes on what the Bible says about God.

But many times people request the tough issues. People want to know if the Bible's message can stand up to modern pressures. I want to assure them it can.

It would be easier if we could preach a lifetime without ever touching on sin, morality, sexuality, lifestyle, or any number of other adrenalin inducers. Controversy makes preaching a more difficult proposition. But, as any pastor knows, a congregation needs the spicier issues if for no other reason than that God fills his Word with just such fare.

However, a crisis is not inevitable. We can preach controversial topics ...

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