Jump directly to the Content

"Leadership: A Unique, Personal Mosaic"

We must learn common leadership principles, but power is released as we become true to our God-given personalities.
Harold Myra

Every leader is unique — magnificently unique. We humans made in God's image are each a distinct universe, and though there may be general principles of leadership we can apply, we all must develop our individual, personal mosaics.

The leaders interviewed in this book are in some ways studies in contrasts. I think back to our discussions in a suburban living room with Fred Smith for Leadership's first interview. The memory of his darting wit contrasts with, say, that of Richard Halverson's open earnestness in an O'Hare Airport room … or Howard Hendricks's lively but professorial interaction in a Dallas coffee shop … or Eugene Peterson's low-key yet penetrating blend of pastoral insight and literary allusion in CTi's conference room.

I looked up the introduction for that first Leadership interview and found this description of Fred: "He possesses not only the fastest ...

Subscriber access only You have reached the end of this Article Preview

To continue reading, subscribe to Christianity Today magazine. Subscribers have full digital access to CT Pastors articles.

Tags:
Posted:
May/June
Support Our Work

Subscribe to CT for less than $4.25/month

Homepage Subscription Panel

Read These Next

From the Magazine
They Might Be Giants. (Or Angels. Or Superhuman Devils.)
They Might Be Giants. (Or Angels. Or Superhuman Devils.)
Who, or what, are the Nephilim? We don’t know—and maybe we don’t need to.
Editor's Pick
Why Suffering Belongs in Our Sermons
Interview
Why Suffering Belongs in Our Sermons
Matthew D. Kim believes addressing pain is part of a preacher’s calling.
close