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Restoring Your Ministry

We mount to heaven mostly on the ruins of our cherished schemes, finding our failures were successes.
A. B. Alcott
Yesterday's errors let yesterday cover.
Susan Coolidge

Animals have a marvelous instinct: after a major trauma, they nest for a while, allowing life to return to normal. For days after our cat's encounter in the neighbor's house, she hung out in the bushes. Katie not only lay low, she walked low, slinking around like a tango dancer. It took about a week for her to become her old self again. But Katie's tactic for recovery made good sense.

Errors inflict grievous wounds — in a pastor's confidence, in a congregation's regard for the pastor, in a church's progress, in interpersonal relationships, in a pastor's family. A kind of depression can set in (sometimes actual clinical depression), making recovery appear only a fleeting hope. I've blown it; I'm a failure! No one will want me now.

One pastor recalls his feelings after a devastating church split: "Early on in ministry, my confidence ...

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September
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