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Forced Out

WHEN I KNOCKED ON THE COUPLE'S massive oak door, a woman answered. Her husband was on the phone.

Her bloodshot eyes signaled immediately that this might not be the routine one-hour pastoral visit I had planned. Rick and Becky were new to the church, and I wanted to get acquainted.

"We almost canceled your visit tonight," she blurted. "Rick and I both lost our jobs this morning. Our boss came by at 9 a.m. and told us that due to corporate reshuffling 'for the good of all concerned,' our jobs were phased out as of today."

The shock, she said, was superseded only by the company's lack of compassion—they had invested fifteen years in the company. Of no one in particular, Becky asked desperately, "And how can they possibly believe this reorganization was the best for everyone involved? Who do they think they are?"

Too bad, I thought, that corporations can't handle terminations in a more Christlike manner.

I stayed several hours, but before leaving, I cautioned them not to make any rash decisions ...

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