Jump directly to the content
How (Not) to Be Worldly: Tracing the Borders of the 'Earthly City'

How (Not) to Be Worldly: Tracing the Borders of the 'Earthly City'

What the ancient phrase can teach today's Christians about our attempts at cultural transformation.

I often hope that my office is haunted. You see, I inhabit a humble corner of cinder-blocked space, with a tiny sliver of window, that was once home to one of my role models: Rich Mouw. Longtime president of Fuller Theological Seminary, Rich made his ...

read more ...

Comments Are Closed

Displaying 1–1 of 1 comments.

1    Show All

J Thomas

August 27, 2012  1:37pm

We should be pragmatic about "the world". But first we need to define what "the world" is. It is a collection of fallen people, their systems of culture and government, and all of their fragmented senses of good and evil. Their social systems come mainly through non-Christian attempts at keeping societal order. Fortunately for us in America, our founding fathers saw the importance of placing God above the government. So they subjected the law to restriction, confining it and keeping it out of the church. They banned it from breaching the door. That is incredibly rare, and what a gift it was to us. They wanted us to build our culture for ourselves, not to dictate it from a government throne on high. So the responsibility falls on each of us individually to allow ourselves to become vessels for Christ to the world...our immediate world. Otherwise the world will never know Christ, and we won't be doing our part to fulfill the great commission.

Report Abuse

Displaying 1–1 of 1 comments.

1    Show All

SUPPORT THIS IS OUR CITY

Make a contribution to help support the This Is Our City project and the nonprofit ministry Christianity Today.Learn more ...

TWITTER

RT @MissionYear: A great collection of articles from @ct_city @CTmagazine http://t.co/OLmjHvUIfr

In honor of Kim Newlen, a friend of @ct_city who died Saturday, we share our story of her battle with cancer: http://t.co/S3FGKhVDuo

RT @CTmagazine: After three years, hundreds of stories, thousands of readers, our tribute to This Is Our City: http://t.co/Gz35NhAdqc @ct_c2026

The top 10 stories of @editor @KatelynBeaty picks her favorites and reflects on lessons learned in 3 years: http://t.co/BQxYdaoyD9

"As a community we have to do a better job of rescuing these young people." The newest (and last) City video: http://t.co/vZL0cRKO7H #RVA