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A (Crooked) House Divided: the Gosselins Announce Their Divorce

Ten years, eight kids, and five seasons later, Jon and Kate call it quits.

And now it's official. As many have speculated in the week since commercials first aired promoting tonight's "big announcement" that would affect the entire family, Jon and Kate Gosselin announced their separation, and, later in the episode, their divorce. This expected announcment confirmed reports leaked this afternoon that Jon and Kate today filed the paperwork for their divorce in a Pennyslvania courthouse.

There isn't much to say that hasn't already been said about the tragic downfall of this family. (See Christianity Today's previous coverage, as well as Scott McClellan's great post on this subject at Collide.) It seemed inevitable; reports have painted Jon as uncomfortable with the media attention, and Kate as eager to continue with the show ("the show must go on" she said in her post-announcement interview). Still, I, along with many, hoped that they could turn their marriage around.

The subplot of the episode involved the design and construction of four "crooked houses" for the kids. While Jon and Kate fought over where to place them, the kids enjoyed the simple pleasures of "playing house." In a particularly heartbreaking scene, two of the younger children pretended they were getting married, presumably to live "happily ever after" in their little crooked houses. Kate said she hoped the houses would create many happy memories, but I can't imagine featuring them in this particular episode will do much to help that. It was difficult to hear their individual voices introduce ...

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