Opinion | Pop Culture

The Social Network's Women Problem

The likely Oscar Best Picture winner's disturbing view of women apparently come not from Mark Zuckerberg's world but from the views of writer Aaron Sorkin.

The Social Network is a Golden Globe winner for Best Drama and one of the most acclaimed films of 2010. The story of how Mark Zuckerberg founded Facebook is a frontrunner for the Best Picture Oscar this Sunday night, and there are people who will be gutted if it loses. It's innovative, stylish, cutting-edge—all those things that have critics tripping over each other to praise and reward.

In one aspect, though, the movie harks back to the stone age: its view of women. In both the early scenes at Harvard University and the later scenes in California, women are there as sex objects and little else. They inspire vengeful fantasies; they strip at parties and go home with strangers; they reward creative nerds for their creativity with spontaneous sex in the bathroom; they get drunk and high and play video games (badly). And that's about it.

In the film, women are barred from any role in either the technological or the business side of Facebook. A female intern at the company is only there ...

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