Opinion | Family

Ditch the Diploma: Why College Graduates Are Questioning Their Education

And why you might question whether God is calling you to get a bachelor's degree.

Across the nation, graduates are tossing their caps into the air and investing their hopes of success in their sheepskins. Not since the Magna Carta has so much faith been put into a piece of paper; indeed, belief in the college diploma seems these days to outpace belief in the document that binds a man and a woman.

For the past couple of generations, conventional wisdom has said that a college degree is the golden ticket to a great job. For a time, because of the simple laws of supply and demand, this was true. In 1947, when just 5 percent of Americans age 25 and over held at least a bachelor's degree, the supply was low, making demand for degreed employees higher. However, with easier access to college through taxpayer-funded student loans, today's bachelor's degree has become yesterday's high-school diploma. Now that over 30 percent of Americans 25 and over have a college degree—and the President has called for that figure to grow to 60 percent—the supply is up, which might ...

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January/February

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