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'Imago Dei' in a Nursing Home

Bringing Alzheimer's into the pro-life Christian conscience.
'Imago Dei' in a Nursing Home
Image: Andrew Beeston / Flickr
'Imago Dei' in a Nursing Home

Imagine getting in your car to head to the grocery store and realizing that despite the countless times you've made the trip, you no longer know how to get there. Or picture this scenario: you're convinced you're living in your childhood home with your parents, only to have a stranger announce that this is actually an assisted-living facility, and your parents are long dead. Or worse yet, imagine having someone call you Mom and being certain you've never seen this person's face in your life.

This is the reality for more and more adults in the U.S. The Department of Health and Human Services launched a new website, alzheimers.gov, in response to a skyrocketing number of older adults with symptoms associated with dementia and Alzheimer's disease. According to the most recent numbers, 35 million Americans now suffer from dementia, including approximately 5 million with Alzheimer's.

As medical advances and technology help us live longer, we as a culture—and specifically as Christians—are faced with increasingly complex end-of-life issues. Memory-related illnesses are among the most devastating—both for those with the diagnosis and for those who love them.

As people who champion the core value that human beings are made in the image of God (Gen. 1:27), Christians have historically made a bold, if not always graceful, stance regarding beginning-of-life issues. The Christian pro-life message has its nuances depending on which niche ...

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