Opinion | Sexuality

Why I Don't Call Myself a Feminist

Christianity offers a culture of life greater than feminism ever could.
Why I Don't Call Myself a Feminist
Image: Bojan Kontrec / iStock

If you were to stop by my house lately, you'd be greeted by stacks of dishes, piles of unfolded laundry, and me sitting in front of my laptop, editing a book for Christian women that I've been working on for almost two years. It's my invitation for them to embrace their imagodei identity, to believe that we are made for more than the banality we often settle for, to believe that we cannot be reduced to being wives or mothers or published authors or PhDs.

This should make me a good candidate to join the burgeoning ranks of evangelicals who embrace the "feminist" label, who contend to be a feminist simply means that you believe that women are human beings.

Within the church, the "F-word" has been a point of tension for several decades. Conservatives want vocal condemnations of feminist ideology and exact explanations of what a woman should and should not do. Progressives want inclusive statements and decisive action against the male oppression they ...

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Posted:October 18, 2013
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