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There are a couple of cautions at this point. Lueken warns, "If we're not careful, we could just exchange one kind of consumers for another. Now we're getting the people who want a deeper life, and those who are into spiritual formation."

And there's the question of navel-gazing. Spiritual formation, with its inward focus, can become as self-centered as the felt-needs approach Oak Hills rejected. Their response: service. Carlson cites the example of a football coach who attends Oak Hills, "a get-it-done kind of guy." He is leading a sports ministry for inner city kids and getting the men of the church involved. "Not a lot of navel-gazing there," Carlson says. "They just get it done, and they're formed in the process."

And there's the temptation to compete with churches that have taken up the consumer-driven model. "In suburbia it's all about things for the kids," Carlson says. But rather than compete for consumers by selling ministry to members, Oak Hills is emphasizing ministry by the members, including youth. "We're building on service. Our kids are serving." And the ministry is growing.

That kind of ministry, Carlson emphasizes, is what sets Oak Hills apart. "The non-churched will be impressed when the church finally starts doing what they think the churches should be doing—not creating a big club where people come because you have the best music, and the best youth program, and the best children's ministry, and the best women's ministry—but serving the poor, seeking to deal with social issues that are of great importance, working with other churches.

"In that, there is a recognition that Christians not only say we're different, but we really are different."

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From Issue:iChurch, Summer 2006 | Posted: January 9, 2012

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Chandra

April 10, 2012  4:25pm

I wish I could find a church like that in my area.

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Pete Bristow

February 19, 2012  7:36pm

this is just what we need to hear. We're a few months into a new leadership structure and talking seriously about what comes next. With a concern to reach families some would like us to try the Seeker-Sensitive approach, others are aware of the rather publicly stated flaws in that style. I've sent the link to this article to my elders to review and pray over. Thanks for the good work.

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